A couple of pointers

Having recently discovered Malina with her jaws clamped firmly around a teddy bears neck, not to mention her demands for black pudding and other blood rich foods, names of which I can’t think of at the moment, we have finally accepted the fact that she is probably a vampire.

Conscious that these things can quickly spiral out of control, having watched several seasons of True Blood I know what I’m talking about, I headed down to the cellar\workshop and fashioned some wooden stakes.

Unbeknown to me Gosia had already tested Malina with garlic, holy water and a couple of mirrors and so as I entered the house from the basement, with wooden stakes in hand, I was relived to know that they would no longer be needed for the original purpose, Malina is just teething!

Still I had quite a number of stakes, as you can never be too careful, so what to do with them? Gosia as ever had the answer and declared that one of the kitchen walls looked a bit bare and that she had a couple of old plate\cup racks, that she had waved a wand over, and they needed fitting.

Now anybody who has a straw bale house will know that you can’t just get the drill out, drill a hole and fit and plug and screw, no first of all you have to put something in the wall to screw to. Luckily I had some wooden stakes to hand, so I set about setting them about the wall to form anchor points for our latest storage solution.

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Mark up
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Make a hole
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Knock in a stake

 

After carefully marking where you need the screws to fit, knock a hole in the wall and drive in the stake. These stakes were about 20cm long made from 5 x 5 cm wood. Additional wedges can be used if the wood has a bit of a wobble on it, although you would be surprised how rigid they are in the compacted bale.

Once you are happy then plaster over and leave to set over night, making sure you leave some kind of mark to remind you where the centre of the wood is.

Next day you should be good to drill your pilot hole through the plaster and into the wooden stakes giving a sturdy mounting point for anything from kitchen cabinets to curtain rails. I’ll update with a photo once the plate racks are in place and fully loaded, just in case 🙂

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Author: Eddy Winko

Trying to leave the rat race and live a less hectic and harmful life. From the building of a straw bale house to the composting toilet diaries; read my blog https://winkos.wordpress.com/

13 thoughts on “A couple of pointers”

  1. I found this article quite interesting. I’ve never seen a straw bale house, but I once baled hay on a blistering summer day. It wasn’t that bad out in the field, but once I began stacking bales in the barn loft, I nearly suffocated. I suppose your house is well regulated.

    1. I’d imagine that the hay is far more dusty with pollen and the like. Thankfully straw is a little more inert and is fairly stable, although I do remember reading is a book from the States on straw bale building that there is a condition called ‘yellow lung’ that agricultural workers used to suffer from after handling hay and straw. As for building regulation, not too much in Poland thankfully:) Once the clay and lime is on the walls it’s much like a normal house except for the lumps and bumps and of course its all natural materials so no nasty chemicals seeping into our environment.

  2. Nothing wrong with a fancy for a bit of black pudding eddy. A girl after my own heart!
    That wall-fixing business has given me a DIY headache just thinking about it.
    I might have to open a bottle of Rioja, to calm my nerves!
    Have a great year mate. It’s brilliant to see you blogging again.

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