Beetle mania and mud flinging ticks the box

Yes I’m still here, although if you had asked me the same question this time last week I may have provided a different answer. Yet again I fell into the bimber trap (Polish moonshine) at yet another neighbours barbeque; we are still the novelty guests in the village and after turning down an invite a few weeks ago we could not say no a second time. As you may have gathered saying no isn’t that easy for me and the resulting grill left me in no fit state to type, drive, walk or talk that much on Sunday; my usual catch up day. A family member’s names day on Sunday afternoon sealed my fate, as I was plied with more vodka and bimber, in the end I was having trouble catching up with myself never mind the blog!

But at last, Sunday has come round again and after an early start to the day (6am) we have managed to walk the dogs, pick a bucket full of cherries for Gosias family, driven out to Rzeszow to exchange some faulty door handles that we purchased last week and made it back to Rzemien for Sunday lunch. On the way here we noticed that a number of people at the side of the forest road selling bilberries, so I can feel a trip is on the cards later in the day; although I’m hoping I can get out of that one as the mosquitoes are thick in the woods. Bilberries taste so much better when picked by someone else J

There you go, rambling on, I better try and catch up, although I’ll try and make it brief, like my notes 🙂

Monday 3rd June: My first tick! Now you may find this is odd but it is a big moment for me as I thought that Polish ticks didn’t like Yorkshire blood, as I have until now, never had a tick. Ticks in Poland can be dangerous and if one latches on it is possible to contract Tick-borne Encephalitis . Gosia soon removed it from my neck with a pinch of the tweezers!

An article I did find that may be of interest regarding ticks and preventing them, although I haven’t tried this yet, its worth a read. https://organicdailypost.com/7-ways-make-yard-hostile-ticks/

I started my first batch of Elderflower beer; recipe to follow.

Tuesday 4th June: The rain keeps coming down and the trenches that I pumped dry of water yesterday are full again; a little disheartening. The weather is so odd at the moment, 23°C and sunny then thunder storms with hail; hail so big that roof tiles are reported as smashed and a friend’s car is dented; mind you it was a Fiat 🙂

Still plenty of work going on in the house, forming the windows and stuffing the gaps and quite a bit of mud flinging; or clay slip to be more accurate.

Wednesday 5th June: My daily mushroom hunt whilst walking the dogs in the morning is paying off, most days I come back with one or two; today I found the Daddy and we had a splendid breakfast of scrambled eggs with mushrooms.

Big daddy
Enough for breakfast for two, with 6 eggs 🙂
Chopped and ready to fry
Chopped and ready to fry

Thursday 6th June: Rain, sun, sun, rain; working between the house and outside on the veg when we get a dry spell; we are now checking for potato beetles every other day. Initially we must have picked a good couple of hundred, but the numbers seem to be reducing, no sign of lave yet which is promising.

Paul, Ringo, George and John
Not much screaming in the crowds, just the snap crackle and pop of drowning beetles (once I added water!)

Friday 7th June: All downstairs windows are now complete, all formed and covered in a thick layer of clay slip; this should provide a good strong base for the next coat once it has dried.

Saturday 8th June: One final push to finish weeding the potatoes, we are joined by Kazek, Kasha and Pawel from next door as they tackled there own patch of spuds; so banter and a few beers fly between the fields. Word must have got out in the village that we were working in adjacent fields as Gosia received a call from another neighbour on Pawels phone; the fated invite to the BBQ. Spuds cleared of weeds by 7pm, tin bathed and out for 8.30pm, home way past midnight.

Monday 10th June: Allowed to drive again! The weather seems to be improving so I pumped out the trenches again and got cracking with the waste pipe out of the house. As we are only getting rid of grey water, sink, bath, shower, washing machine etc. then all the pipe is 50mm, this saves quite a bit of money and it fits together nice and easy. Pipes in, trenches filled, job done.

We noticed that the straw and clay above the windows is sagging a little under the weight of the wet clay so we added a few props to take the pressure off; I reckon on another week at least before they have set.

Window support
Window support
Window support 02
At least a week to set and then we will see if this worked.

Tuesday 11th June: The old cherry tree is at last giving up it’s fruit, the event is normally marked by the arrival of the ever squawking jays as they top feed off the tree, but as yet I haven’t heard them.  My new dog walking route is set to go pat the tree so I can grab a feed every morning 🙂

As ever though there has to be a balance to this new bounty and this is marked with the arrival of the horse flies, or bonk as they are called in Poland. We are fortunate that we only occasionally get mosquitos around the land, but the horse flies certainly make up for is during the day and they often draw blood if your not quick enough with your slapping hand.

News comes through that a friend of ours, who has always said he would help with the building of the terrace, will be here later in the week. Suddenly kicked into gear with the news I start to dig the post foundations.

Wednesday 12th June: The weather has at last returned to its normal self and our mood is improving; just as well as the post foundations are over a meter deep through hard clay and my enthusiasm is tested; luckily there are only ten to dig!

Took some time to sort out the wood for the terrace, we have borrowed a plainer thicknesser to plain the wood for the construction; so trying to get things in some kind of order.

Thursday 13th June: More of the same with some weeding thrown in for good measure. Life is good and we are starting to reap the rewards for all our work in the garden. Not a day goes by without the consumption of one of our crops; strawberries have been a daily desert for almost two weeks now and every meal is served with a salad of spring onions, lettuce, radish and any number of fresh herbs.

Friday 14th June: On with the terrace, or at least marking out and marking up; we are planning to rest the upright posts on pins set in concrete from the ground, a little more elegant than the metal shoes that you often see. One friend has welded some rebar to 12 mm threaded bar to provide a more solid fix in the concrete and Gosias uncle is cutting some steel plate for the bottom of the posts; I have to admire the way that the problems are solved in Poland, the land of invention 🙂

Post Pins
All pins in a row

Saturday 15th June: One cement, two sand, three gravel; or should I say half a bag of cement, four shovels of sand and six shovels of gravel per load. Roughly two and a half loads per hole and we had the job done by lunch time, a job well done; I even managed to get some foundations down for the second composting toilet I’m building. And whilst all this was going on Gosia was busy getting to grips with the plainer and the smoothed wood was piling up. I’m looking forward to Monday and the start of the framing.

Did the earth move for you?

Monday 20th May: Another slow start to the week for us as we had more paper work to complete for the EU amongst other things and we didn’t reach the ranch till gone 4pm; still the weather was good so we set about the garden weeding, planting, inspecting and detecting. I spotted quite a few ants on the broad beans, a sure sign that the black fly are about, so I gave them a good sprinkle with by nettle brew diluted 5-1; it worked last year so fingers crossed.

For the record the nettle brew first started life as nettle beer, I collected almost a kilo of nettle tips with the intention of adding yeast and sugar to complete the brewing process, but time went by and the nettles had decided they wanted to be plant food by the time I got my act together. So I added water to the bucket to cover the nettles, weighed down by a plate and stone, then let the mixture infuse for a good week or so. The resulting liquid, which by the way smalls quite a bit, can then be used as a plant food mixed at 10-1 or an insecticide against aphids mixed at 5-1. For a few more ideas on what to do with your nettles try  The Foragers Year, Food and Forage Hebrides or Under the Linden Tree. My beer recipe will have to wait for now.

Tuesday 21st May: At long last I started to put the electric fence up, some how we just don’t seem to have the motivation for the house and besides other jobs need doing, so I opted for the fence! We had the call in the afternoon that the digger is turning up in the morning so I cracked open a fresh bag of lime to mark out where we want him to dig; the French drain around the house, the trench for the water pipe from the borehole, the grey water waste drain and quite a bit of landscaping; he’s going to be busy! I managed to finish the fence 🙂

I also managed to empty the toilet, just in case you were thinking that we had two buckets! How we managed to go so long between disposal is anyone’s guess, maybe we are eating less or just using more of the food we eat? Looking back we have spent a few extra mornings in Rzemien, so this probably explains things 🙂

Wednesday 22nd May: After explaining what we wanted to achieve we were told that there was a couple of days work, considering you pay by the hour this wasn’t the best news we had heard in a while, but then a JCB is a lot quicker than me with a shovel, especially when the French drain had to go in almost 2 meters deep, so we asked him to crack on.

I can only describe the next ten hours as ballet with heavy machinery, each swing of the arm was matched with the tip of the bucket ready for the next gouge in the earth or sweep of debris; this man could dig! In the ten hours that he was there he only stopped to wait for me to empty the bucket of gravel as I shovelled it out and into the trench for the drain; his lunch was eaten on the move and he refused the offer of coffee, tea and beer on several occasions, I’m sure he was using his feet to make those hydraulics frolic the way that they did. Just shy of 100 metres of trench dug at varying depths, backfilled and a whole area landscaped in 10 Hours, we can’t praise this guy enough; a fantastic job done and in half the time expected. The earth certainly moved for us!

Thursday 23rd May: At last the weather has broken, it had threatened most of the day yesterday, but the rain held off until now and today we are dealing with a fifteen degree temperature drop, a persistent drizzle and the threat of thunder in the distance. Tough and delicate negations had to be made first thing in the morning to determine who was going to get out of a nice warm bed to put the kettle on and get the milk from the fridge in the barn next door; at least I had brought in the water from the well the night before; valuable ammunition to bring to the table!

As the day brightened up as we experimented with chicken wire, chainsaws and hedge trimmers in the house, then we decide that as we now had a fence up we should get the remaining plants out in the top field. That kept us going for the afternoon and the house was left to wait another day.

Tomato tyres
Each home to a tomato plant each; with different ‘soil’

Friday 24th May:  Even the best negotiators know that it’s all about give and take and whilst I took the tea yesterday I was happy to give it back as coffee today 🙂 The rain really is here now and the house has us back within it’s heart and the task of stuffing gaps in the straw, making noggins for the floor and sills for the windows have taken priority. The occasional sunny spell sees us out in the garden and at long last I have planted two tomato plants for the humanure experiment. Two tyres, two plants and two mixes of compost, one shop bought the other home made; planted with an equal mix of mole hill soil to bulk things out and set up close to the stable and close together so that they get the same treatment; we will see how it develops.

Saturday 25th May: More of the same and my first window sill is complete, the template for the next four windows of the same size. Having an early finish today as we have to pick up the plainer thicknesses that we are borrowing from a friend, I say early, it’s close to 5pm before we leave.

Birch Bolete
Soon to be a sauce.

But how could I forget, Gosia found our first mushrooms of the year, a bit eaten but non the less very edible and free of worms; I haven’t checked to be certain but they look very much like Birch Bolete (Leccinum scabrum); the combination of rain and a full moon played their part no doubt. The dogs will be happy as their walks will go further afield now as I try and hunt down more of our favourite free foraged food.

All in all a good week, a bit thin on the ground with the photos but my hands have remained dirty for the duration and I’m cautious about going out in the rain with the camera; I have to make it last, however I did managed to get a few shots of the first signs of fruit on the trees and the now glorious Guelder rose (Viburnum opulus)  in bloom around our out door dining room.

Walnut.jpg
A good year for walnuts?
Pear.jpg
If the apples fail at least we will have pears; I’ll have a Babycham!
Guelder Rose.jpg
No cut flowers on our table 🙂
Guelder Rose02.jpg
A purple garlic flower trying to get in on the action.

Knife crime!

As you walk down the streets of many of the rural villages at this time of the year you will be surprised by the number of people carrying knives; not just young people, but middle-aged and even pensioners, all brandishing a variety of sharpened cutlery. Now if this were England then the local constabulary would have a field day rounding them up on charges of carrying an offensive weapon; thankfully Polish law hasn’t gone too mad yet and having a knife on your person is in no way considered strange even less so if you also happen to have a wicker basket in your other hand and especially if there are mushrooms in the forest waiting to be picked and trimmed with the veg knife and placed in said basket.

So, as we are back in Rzemien for a religious holiday (wszystkich swietych) we thought it best to join the rest of the village in the hunt for mushrooms; after all last year was a poor crop, so the intention is to pick and dry enough to last two years, just in case. Personally I thought that after the frost and snow we had last week the mushrooms would have packed up for the year, but as the temperature rises again and the rain reaches the forest floor new life is popping up all over. So the van is brought into service and stools from the kitchen provide temporary seating for extra passengers as five of us set off to the heart of the forest, Gosias mum navigating. Right left and straight on where some of the first words I learnt in Polish (Pravo, levo, prosto) and I have had a few opportunities to practice as I’ve taken polish speaking only hunting parties out in the past.

Our main crop this time is the Bay Bolete with the occasional Cep thrown in for good measure but then, just as we have decided to head home as we have no more space available in the five baskets we collectively carry, we stumbled upon five of the biggest Orange Birch Bolete of the year. So big in fact that decided to take a photo of the better specimens.

It is advised that you discard the stalks, they can be eaten but they are tough unless cooked for a long time; the flesh is fantastic used in a sauce, or like today, on top of a pizza. The young bay bolete will be pickled or dried, the older specimens will probably be a sauce to go with Sunday lunch.

Update 4th November: Back out on the hunt today, I have requested a bigger basket!

Update later in the day: don’t ask for a bigger basket, you will jinx the hunt; not so full baskets today, better luck tomorrow morning.

Update 5th November: Defiantly a jinx, took a smaller basket this morning and we all returned with aching arms carrying full baskets 🙂

Bay Bolete identification below, notice the pours and the way the flesh turns blue when cut. The brown cap can lighter or darker in shade, the spores are always yellow when young, becoming darker as they age.

A few days off

After successfully completing the second lime render coat and resolving to put on the final finish coat in the spring we decided to take a few days off. Not that that means we can rest much, as we search for soffits for the house, doors for the Piec (cooking range) and mushrooms in the forest.

We managed to find some great cast iron doors for the bread oven at the antiques market in Rzeszow, which is held every second Sunday of the month, along with an upgraded heating system for the stable -photo to follow once installed. Called a koza in Polish, which strangely enough also means goat!

DSC04209

As for the mushroom hunt, it’s going well. Saturdays haul was four baskets full in about three hours and Mondays result was a further three; all to be dried or pickled, with a few of the poorer specimens destined to be made into a sauce for lunch. I have to admit that my hunting skills are poor in comparison with Gosias mum, who seems to be able to imagine where the mushrooms are as she forges ahead stopping to bend and pick the next target in one fluid motion. The result is a full basket long before anyone else and a feeling of disbelief from her fellow hunters; mind you they are all heading for the same pot at the end of the day so its all good and every now and again you stumble across the mother of all mushrooms and your inadequacy is forgotten as you are congratulated on a good find.

DSC04190 DSC04194

There is also the added bonus that the dogs get a good walk, which makes them appreciate the reward of some of the bones from our summer lambs that much more.

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Anyhow, back to it tomorrow, back to the land of farmers, hard graft and bathing in a tin bath. We have enjoyed our little holiday and Gosia managed to pick up four seasons of Rumpole of the Bailey on DVD for 25p at the local market; so our evenings will be full for the next few weeks!

What the Fly Agaric!

DSC04162With the rain comes the possibility of mushrooms and the first to show are the Fly Agaric, having read a little more about them its no wonder that Alice had an adventure in Wonderland! It has a reputation more for killing flies than people as it was traditionally used as a fly killer; perhaps this explains the name? Whilst poisonous it is rarely fatal and is actually eaten in some parts of Germany, Siberia and a few other eastern European countries: I think the trick is to part boil it in lots of water, but I don’t think I’ll be trying them soon even, if it does have hallucinogenic properties Smile

Anyhow the point of this post is to highlight the national obsession that Poland has with mushrooms, people take time off work, cars line the sides of the roads that run through the forests, it even becomes a topic on the national news; but don’t get me wrong, I love it and even take part, hunting for mushrooms whenever I have a spare moment; even by torch light when I take the dogs for a walk in the evening; Cep, Orange Birch Bolete, Slippery Jack and Chanterelle all live in fear of me as I trail through the woods. However the one thing that I’m struggling to get used to is that everybody has the right to roam in Poland and roam they do, through your land! It just take time to get used to it, people passing by as you’re taking a pee in the woods, or even as you use the outside composting toilet, when your picking your nose or signing out of tune! It just doesn’t seen right. But that’s the law in Poland, you can go where you want, whenever you want and the only thing to stop you is a ‘Teren Prywatny’ sign.

Now it was a dilemma for a little while, to put up signs or not, but then I remembered how many fields I wander through whilst walking the dogs, how many woods I stalk my pray in when the Fly Agarics appear; and all in all its not a bad deal having the right to roam. After all everybody else has more land than us and we always clear our land of mushrooms long before the wanderers wander into our not so private land.